3-4 point high approach, inside contact, hanging connection

    Keywords: Joseki

Table of contents

Joseki

[Diagram]
Joseki  

W1 to W7 is a very common 3-4 point joseki. Subsequently, a White move at a or a Black move at b is very large. The reason is that the checking extension of b amplifies the severity of a Black invasion at c. However, it should be noted that even with White a, the invasion at c still exists, but much less severe.

Depending on the left side of the board, B6 may choose to play at d or e. B6 here settles the position in one move, while B6 at d or e emphasizes an additional extension on the left side. B6 playing the clamp at f is an old joseki.

Compared to the joseki when W5 makes a solid connection (see 3-4 point high approach, inside contact, solid connection), deep invasion by Black is quite possible - but it has good prospects for future development.

There are other variants to the joseki, see the section on "Variants" below.

[Diagram]
Strengthening the base  

Because the invasion can potentially rob White of his base, it is usual for White to jump at W2 in response to B1.


Invasion

The remainder of this page discusses the invasion when White did not defend his three-point extension.

[Diagram]
Invasion  

Because the B1 threatens to connect at a, the standard reply is at W2. Many of the sequences after W2 are well-established enough to be called side joseki. B3 can be played at b for territory, or c for outside influence. B3 at d leads to a ko that is heavy for both players, so the timing for this move is important.

A discussion of why W2 is better than a can be found here.

[Diagram]
Not recommended  

W1 here is not recommended. After B2 and W3, B4 connects. White has lost his base and his outside is not thick, and Black can aim at cutting the white+circle stone at a. This result is undoubtly favourable for Black.



Going for territory

[Diagram]
Going for territory  

B1 here goes for territory, so White will get the outside influence. The traditional reply here is W2. Here, B3 is a tesuji which creates a weakness on White's exterior, so the loss-making exchange of W8 with B9 is necessary for preventing a Black cut at a.

[Diagram]
Going for territory  

This is one of the side josekis after the invasion.

[Diagram]
Variant side joseki  

W6 in the previous diagram can also be played at W1 here, avoiding the loss-making exchange of a and b. The sequence up to W5 has also been established as a side joseki.

[Diagram]
More recent variation  

A more recent variation by White is to play the diagonal move at W1, followed by a thick move at W3.



Going for influence

[Diagram]
Going for influence  

Making a high small knight's move at B1 here aims at getting influence. W2 connects and obtains a base, but White' position is generally low.

[Diagram]
Going for influence  

This sequence is also considered a side joseki.



Ko

[Diagram]
Ko  

Black also has the option of attaching at B1 and starting a ko. This is the only sequence that actually severes the connection of the white+circle stone, and usually is the only sequence available when there is no black+circle stone (or even when there is a White at a). The resulting ko can be heavy for both players, because the winner of this ko usually gets something that looks like a ponnuki.

When Black has just taken back the ko, and both players have no more suitable ko-threats, White may consider a move at b. This usually forces Black c, then White can look forward to taking the ko at d and then ending it with a ponnuki at e. Of course, Black gets to play two moves elsewhere.


Variants

[Diagram]
Joseki  

It is possible for B6 to make a peep at the hanging connection if Black wants to emphasize the left side. However, the possibility of invasion at a is now essentially lost.

B8 is sometimes seen at b instead.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

In recent years, the direct pincer at B6 is also common. In professional games, one of the most common reply is W7, and typically Black will tenuki.

W7 may also be played at a, but because the hanging connection is looser than the solid connection, typically Black will plat at b instead of c, and a fight will erupt. See 3-4 point high approach, inside contact, hanging connection, pincer fight for more.


/Discussion


3-4 point high approach, inside contact, hanging connection last edited by Dieter on December 11, 2012 - 18:52
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