3-4 point, high approach, inside contact

  Difficulty: Beginner   Keywords: Joseki
[Diagram]
Joseki  

B1 here is one of the most common of all joseki plays. It asks for the corner and possibly towards the sides as well.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

Blocking at W2 here is expected. It prevents Black from making further inroads to the upper side.

W2 can also bump into the 3-4 point stone at a. This can result in the avalanche joseki[1], which can get complicated.

Although less common, it is also possible for white stretch at b in some cases, as this reverts to a variation of the 3-4 point distant high approach, corner keima joseki. This is sometimes done when white wants sente.

W2 at x is considered a mistake. See BQM 103 for details.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

B3 is usual. Playing at a was an innovation of Kitani Minoru, and still occasionally is seen in pro games: it implies a highly territorial attitude. See 3-4 point high approach inside contact, sagari.

A black counter-hane at y or cross-cut at x is not joseki, see non-joseki exercise 1 and non-joseki exercise 3.

It is not advisable to tenuki with B3, because white at B3 is extremely damaging.

3-4 point, high approach, inside contact, solid connection 3-4 point, high approach, inside contact, hanging connection cosmic style 3-4 point, high approach, inside contact, tenuki variation
[Diagram]
Joseki  

At this point White will often make a solid connection at a or a hanging connection at b. These are both standard plays and equally common; they have slightly different implications but in both cases White will extend along the top side next. Below we show the most typical joseki for each of a and b, and the reader is referred to 3-4 point, high approach, inside contact, solid connection and 3-4 point, high approach, inside contact, hanging connection for details.

White at c is part of the Takemiya 'cosmic style' and is possible in the overall context of some strategies.

Another strategy is for White to play tenuki at this point. White often plays in the upper right and hopes to be able to clarify the position in that corner before deciding between a and b. Of course, this does run the risk that Black plays next in this corner, usually by cutting at a. See 3-4 point high approach, inside contact, tenuki variation.

The main difference between a and b is that a is more solid while b allows white to extend one intersection further. See /discussion for more about a or b. Also sometimes white will probe the opposite side before choosing, see ProbingDuringTheAttachAndDrawBackJoseki.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

The most typical joseki when playing W4 as the solid connection is shown here. In this diagram, W6 may also make a three-space extension at a instead. See 3-4 point, high approach, inside contact, solid connection for more.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

White playing W4 as the hanging connection allows or aims for extending a line further to W6 at the expense of the circled weaknesses in the shape. See 3-4 point, high approach, inside contact, hanging connection for more.


[1] Strictly speaking the "avalanche joseki" only applies when Black hanes at B4 here:

[Diagram]
Small Avalanche Joseki  



or B6 here

[Diagram]
Large Avalanche Joseki  

3-4 point, high approach, inside contact last edited by Dieter on April 22, 2020 - 09:52
RecentChanges · StartingPoints · About
Edit page ·Search · Related · Page info · Latest diff
[Welcome to Sensei's Library!]
RecentChanges
StartingPoints
About
RandomPage
Search position
Page history
Latest page diff
Partner sites:
Go Teaching Ladder
Goproblems.com
Login / Prefs
Tools
Sensei's Library