HermanHiddema/Joseki Learning Order

Sub-page of HermanHiddema

In what order do people learn joseki?

Table of diagrams
Handicap joseki
4-4 low approach
4-4 low approach, slide
4-4 point, 3-3 invasion
3-3 invasion, main line
3-3 invasion, double hane
3-4 high approach, attach under
3-4 high approach, attach under (2)
3-4 high approach, keima

The first joseki most people learn are 4-4 point joseki, due to the fact that handicap stones are mostly on the 4-4 points.

[Diagram]
Handicap joseki  

This joseki is mostly played in high handicap games (8-9 stones), where the marked stone black+circle is in place. Many beginning players do not truly understand this sequence, but have been taught to play it by stronger players. The concepts that W3 makes white heavy, and that W5 is overconcentrated are quite advanced.

Beginners will often later make the mistake of playing B2 when the marked black+circle stone is not present. Without that stone, the B2-W3 exchange is no good, because it strengthens white while not really protecting the corner (a 3-3 invasion is still possible), and white can make an ideal extension after B4 by playing W5 on the side hoshi (where black+circle is in the diagram) or below it. (For full explanation, see: Joseki as a source of bad habits)

[Diagram]
4-4 low approach  

As handicaps gets smaller (2-7 stones), joseki start to appear in situations where the side hoshi is still open. Players will learn that the low approach W1 is a normal move, and that playing B2 (or b) in response is also normal. W3 completes this short and simple joseki

[Diagram]
4-4 low approach, slide  

Instead of W3 in the previous diagram, sliding like this is also popular. This is another simple joseki, with black defending the corner with B4 and white making a base with W5

[Diagram]
4-4 point, 3-3 invasion  

The 3-3 invasion of the 4-4 point will also surface quite quickly once the handicap goes down. Although this invasion is unusual with high handicap, because it forces black's stones to work together, it will appear regularly once the handicap goes down to 5 or less, where white can try to neutralize the sides before invading the corner.

[Diagram]
3-3 invasion, main line  

This is the most common follow-up to the 3-3 invasion. White gets territory in the corner, and sente, while black builds an impressive wall.

[Diagram]
3-3 invasion, double hane  

This double hane with B6 is the main alternative. Here black prefers to take the corner, while white gets a strong ponnuki on the outside and retains sente.

[Diagram]
3-4 high approach, attach under  

This joseki is one of the first 3-4 joseki in the repertoire of beginners. It is simple and gives both players stable formations. W7 can also be one line higher, at a.

[Diagram]
3-4 high approach, attach under (2)  

This variation is also popular, and is generally learned at the same time as the one above.

[Diagram]
3-4 high approach, keima  

Another simple joseki that gives both players a reasonably stable shape. B2 is a popular way to avoid the avalanche joseki that can appear after the attachment under W1.


tapir: Think about joining forces with JosekiEveryDDKShouldKnow

BramGo: The following website basicly does the same thing. It's a list of joseki ordered in categories of reccomended rating. [ext] BruGo - Joseki By Rank


HermanHiddema/Joseki Learning Order last edited by 91.178.186.242 on November 2, 2009 - 14:40
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