3-4 point low approach one-space low pincer press

    Keywords: Joseki
NineteenPointTrickPlay
[Diagram]
Black's answers  

A database search shows that only two moves, a and b are popular. c is a trick play known in Japan as the nineteen point trick play.


[Diagram]
Press  

Typically, the press at W1 is played when there are coordinating White stone(s) at the upper right corner.


[Diagram]
Joseki  

A simple joseki is for Black to play the crawl at B2 and jumps out at B4. White has given Black territory, and W5 attacks the lone stone to get profit to offset the territory lost. Sometimes W5 is played at a.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

White can also to play large scale with W5, depending on the whole board situation, and a pushing battle ensues. B10 will typically play the double hane.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

Making use of the double atari weakness of the double hane, W1, W3 and W5 is the perfect chance to take some profit at the corner. Then W7 ataris and W9 extends. If B10, then White a, Black b, and White gains sente to attack the lone Black stone at the top, perhaps at c.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

Black can also gain sente with B1 and B3, but after W4, White is extremely thick and it may not be easy for Black to find a suitable move at the top.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

Depending on the whole board situation again, Black may choose to crawl four times to gain sente so that Black gets to play B8. But W9 is a large move that seals Black in.


[Diagram]
Joseki  

There is also the push at B2 and the cut at B4. Typically the result is an exchange ending at W9. Later, a may be a point of contention for both players when it comes to influence.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

B1 may begin a complicated fight. W4 is a tit-for-tat move.

Charles There are some variations here in which White starts by pressing at a (and presses more than once). Then White fights at W4, or the square or circle points.



[Diagram]
Joseki  

A simple outcome of this is for Black to sacrifice the two Black stones in the middle and settle for an exchange.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

B1 and B3 is another way. Note that B3 at B7 is a mistake.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

W2 increases the number of liberties of the dead stones for more aji, and W4 is vital to prevent Black from making a very comfortable atari there. W6 is a tesuji that exploits the aji from W2 to gain profit, and B7 is also a tesuji that minimizes the loss in the corner.

[Diagram]
Joseki  

We have a fight in the middle.


3-4 point low approach one-space low pincer press last edited by Unkx80 on December 10, 2008 - 11:34
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