3-4 point, high approach, one-space low pincer, 3-3 attachment

    Keywords: Joseki
#hane #jump #cut
[Diagram]
Joseki  

The attachment at W1 is a common reply to the one space low pincer. Black will usually either cut at a or play hane at b. The immediate jump to c is a new pattern that is still being explored.

Table of contents Table of diagrams
Joseki
Cut
Main line
Atari
Not joseki
Kosumi
Kosumi continuation
Black plays on both sides
Modern style
Modern style - ctd
Modern style - ctd (2)
Modern style - var
Black jumps
White makes shape
Taking the corner - Follow up 1
Extending on the side - Follow up 2
White ends with a "weak ponnuki"
Typical mistake - White ends with only one eye in the corner, Black develops on both sides
inferior for white
white gets bad shape
Wrong cut


Cut on the inside

#atari #crawl
[Diagram]
Cut  

Black cuts at B2 and W3 is forced. Next there are the old continuation at a, which can be considered the main line, and a rather new one at b.


Crawl

[Diagram]
Main line  

When Black crawls, W2 wedge is tesuji. Without this move, the attachment in the corner would not be playable for white.

Next, black can atari from above at a, or from below at b, these moves are further explored at 3-4 point, high approach, one-space low pincer, 3-3 attachment, cut and crawl


Atari

[Diagram]
Atari  

Against B1 and B3, W4 is tesuji. An exchange takes place with Black taking corner territory and sente and White influence towards side and center. The result is considered slightly better for White locally but playable for Black in many circumstances.

[Diagram]
Not joseki  

W4 here is not so good. The marked stone is under little pressure and Black will find it easy to dispose of the situation.


Trick play diagonal

[Diagram]
Kosumi  

An interesting move (but hamete) that has potential use in some situations

[Diagram]
Kosumi continuation  

Black trades the corner and some stones to get development on both sides.


Hane on the outside

[Diagram]
Black plays on both sides  

This is a well-established line too. Next White plays a (simple), or b, c which are both complex. See 34 Point ,High Approach, One Space Low Pincer, 33-Attachment, Outside Hane, Large Scale Fight.

Recently there have been experiments with B4, also.

[Diagram]
Modern style  

Kogo's joseki dictionary says that this is the modern way, and gives some variations which look rather complicated. Game search have found 121 pro games with this position, mostly played since 1997; a is by far the most common continuation (70/121), but all of b through e appear also. More SL analysis needed, a.o. about white forcing at 'f' then attacking at 'g'.

[Diagram]
Modern style - ctd  

In [ext] http://www.gooften.net, Antti Tormanen continues to explain this joseki. W1 needs a ladder. After B10, a would be a crude connection, leaving a peep at b that would force an empty triangle. Instead ...

[Diagram]
Modern style - ctd (2)  

... W1 itself forces an empty triangle and a connection through B6, while White fixes her shape. The whole board context then will decide on the timing of living with a, which will tend to be dominated by the fight for stability at the top. Incidentally, b is White's privilege and should be left unplayed to keep the option of connecting underneath at c, adter a has been played.

[Diagram]
Modern style - var  

This variation, where Black connects underneath using B1, then extends to a, relates to [100] but is much better for White given the position of the white+circle stones. As Antti mentions in [ext] his article, White gets a thick position in sente while Black is low.


Two point jump

[Diagram]
Black jumps  

B2 is a fast play. White has some exciting and very tricky options. d and c are commonly played on Tygem. e: see BQM522.

[Diagram]
White makes shape  

W3 may be the most standard continuation. a and b both appeared as followups for white to strengthen his group, but it seems a variety of moves are being experimented with.

[Diagram]
Taking the corner - Follow up 1  
[Diagram]
Extending on the side - Follow up 2  

tapir: MasterGo has a first isolated occurence in 1987 (Ha Chan Soek vs. Yang Su Yeong), and 8 games in 2007 and 20 in 2008 featuring this pattern (2009 games are not yet updated). Results are usually good for white (winning 63%).

[Diagram]
White ends with a "weak ponnuki"  
[Diagram]
Typical mistake - White ends with only one eye in the corner, Black develops on both sides  

[100]

[Diagram]
inferior for white  

Black simply extends down the left in response to W2.

[Diagram]
white gets bad shape  

white+circle becomes overconcentrated when white captures B4. If W1 at a instead, black extends across the top to the right to b


Hane at the head - Noseki

[Diagram]
Wrong cut  

Cutting with B1-B3 is no good. For analysis, see 3-4 point high approach one-space low pincer attachment noseki


3-4 point, high approach, one-space low pincer, 3-3 attachment last edited by 71.72.56.201 on February 10, 2013 - 00:18
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