Yamashita Keigo

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Yamashita Keigo (山下 敬吾)

Yamashita Keigo (山下 敬吾, b. 6 September 1978 in Asahikawa, Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan) is a Japanese, professional 9-dan of the Nihon Kiin. He has been one the top players in Japan since the early 2000s, winning over 20-titles. He was a student of the Ryokusei Academy.

Yamashita learned how to play go from his parents at the age of five. He disliked losing so much that he stopped playing until he saw his older brother monopolizing his mother over the go board. In 1986, he won the 7th Boys and Girls Go Tournament, becoming the Elementary School Student Meijin. His photo was placed in the Igo Club magazine, and as a reward he received a four stone teaching game from Kobayashi Koichi and Kato Masao. Kato said that Yamashita had 'strong-willed face.'

On January 1, 1988, Yamashita and his older brother enrolled at the Ryokusei Academy with support of their parents. Yamashita became a professional five years later in 1993.

Style

Yamashita has a powerful, active and creative attacking style that makes him one of the most aggressive players of his generation. As such, his games are popular among go fans and media.

Regarding his early style, Yamashita said:

Around the time when I became professional, I feel like I got strong. I was able to see the board as a whole. Around the time when I was a low dan player, I valued fighting above everything else, all-out fighting. It was unrestrained fighting go. From a different viewpoint, it was undisciplined go.[1]

Furthermore, he said that it was a kind of 'power go,' where the aim was to play the most severe move possible, but it was still an immature go.

In order to improve his fighting he studied the games of Honinbo Dosaku and Honinbo Jowa more closely. From Dosaku he learned to play safe moves that delayed whole-board fighting until the time was right, but didn't put him behind in the overall game. From Jowa he learned how to sharpen his fighting even more.

Rank Promotion

  • 1993: 1d
  • 1993: 2d
  • 1995: 3d
  • 1996: 4d
  • 1997: 5d
  • 1998: 6d
  • 2000: 7d
  • 2003: 9d

Titles[2]

Awards & Recognitions[2]

  • 2001: 38th Shusai Prize
  • 2001: Journalists' Club prize?
  • 2001: Kido Prize?
  • 2009: 700 career wins
  • 2012: 800 career wins

Career Statistics

Year Total Win Loss Win %
1993 28 21 7 75.0%
1994 33 22 11 66.7%
1995 45 35 10 77.8%
1996 51 39 12 76.5%
1997 69 60 9 87.0%
1998 75 60 15 80.0%
1999 67 55 12 82.1%
2000 77 59 18 76.6%
2001 69 50 19 72.5%
2002 88 61 17 69.3%
2003 52 34 18 65.4%
2004 71 39 32 54.9%
2005 53 33 20 62.3%
2006 68 44 24 64.7%
2007 57 32 25 56.1%
2008 51 27 24 52.9%
2009 55 38 17 69.1%
2010 63 40 23 63.5%
2011 52 32 20 61.5%
2012 46 26 20 56.5%
Total 1160 807 353 69.6%

Books


Trivia

  • After winning the 65th Honinbo title in 2010 Yamashita took the name Honinbo Dowa (本因坊 道吾). He is able to use the honorific title for as long as he holds the Honinbo title.

Notes

[1] Reference: Aiming to Become the World’s Number One (1999), trans. Robert J. Terry, [ext] http://gowizardry.com/?p=695
[2] Reference: Nihon Kiin profile: [ext] http://www.nihonkiin.or.jp/player/htm/ki000307.htm (Japanese)

See Also


Yamashita Keigo last edited by 68.99.65.50 on October 4, 2014 - 00:18
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