Nameless Tesuji

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    Keywords: Tesuji

Note, if you know or can invent the names of the tesuji, move diagrams to new pages. (this has been done now for all but the last example --Dieter)


Uberdude: I'd say this is an example of shortage of liberties (Damezumari), though perhaps there is a more specific name for this type on the edge.

[Diagram]
Sagari saves and kills  

Imagist: What about "mineshaft tesuji" for this one? The area around 2 looks like a place where white can't follow because she'll fall down the mineshaft (maybe that's my overactive imagination).+

Looks to me like a watari. ~srn347

senderle: Yes, it's a watari, but that term is more general; not every watari involves a shortage of liberties that prevents the opponent from cutting. I like mineshaft tesuji!


Something from the endgame. Beginner's level.

[Diagram]
Common with beginners.  

W1 gives double atari ignoring the osae, black tries to attack back with B2, and W3 cuts. Further analysed at Send Two Return One Watari.

[Diagram]
The same tesuji  

Jared Beck: The same tesuji, also common with beginners. I wish I still got to play simple tesuji like this. My opponents don't make such mistakes anymore!

Rather than calling this move a tesuji, however, I think makes more sense to call Black 2 "Anti-suji" This paradigm of learning the wrong move is more helpful to beginners than the paradigm of learning the response to the wrong move.

I borrow the term "Anti-suji" from Sakata Eio's book "Tesuji and Anti-suji of Go"

Bill: How about cut-back?

Paul: I love this tesuji because my friend and I discovered it ourselves when we used to play Go together when at primary school. My friend used to call it "the old sea captain's trick"!

Guest: As a begineer I'd really appreciate some clues as to a good response to this.

Bill: Play B2 at 3.


[Diagram]
Another quite common situation.  

This happens sometimes even at IGS 5k* level. But in most games it is never played and remains a hidden threat that limits opponent's freedom of choice.

If you look at it this really is just a ladder that turns around a stone. You can call it a "Ladder" so it really isn't nameless. -Enz0

Bill: How about roll-up?



[Diagram]
Tesuji from joseki 2  

Calvin: B1 is a light way to play, which makes miai of a and b.

Both of these tesuji work by making the opponent choose between answering an attachment (which is usually good) or protecting or taking advantage of a move nearby. Either way, you get something. I find this idea rather interesting, but don't know what they are called.
tderz: That example is either in GalacticGo (Vol. 1) or in "Whole board Tesujis". I will check whether they gave it a name there.

Slarty: Yes it's interesting, although an idea instead of a local pattern. Perhaps "creating a (second) good followup," "tenuki probe" or "contact with miai followup." Playing two local moves in a row: "time travel"


See also:


Path: <= Tesuji =>
Nameless Tesuji last edited by Dieter on April 24, 2014 - 17:03
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