9x9 Tengen Openings

    Keywords: Opening

Nico: As I have seen that this is the most frequent move, I'd love that some experienced players illustrate some typical 9x9 openings at tengen, to first show how to use it effectively, but also how to defend against it.

[Diagram]
Tengen opening  

Charles Matthews Many 9x9 games are available at [ext] http://gobase.org/9x9/. This opening is the standard, I believe.

Strategy depends somewhat on komi, I'm told. Assuming 6.5, the conventional wisdom says that White must make two separate living groups - which isn't so easy. That is, low-ranked pros seem to find this an interesting speed game.


[Diagram]
White to play  

Matthew Macfadyen once used this 9x9 position when I asked him some question about probing moves. (I can't remember what the question was now.)

Anyway, where should White play next?

[Diagram]
Probe  

The idea is for White to probe at 1. Black then will normally want to answer at one of the circled points. Then ...

[Diagram]
Probe  

The symmetry is broken, so White can choose to play 2, which is now better than the circled point.

Well, I thought this was interesting. It probably does not belong on this page. So feel free to move it to a better home. --TimHunt

Oh, shall. A bit questionable that, though. Black could for example answer at a. White can claim a good exchange perhaps, but anything on this size of board is so tactical that you need some concrete continuation. Charles


[Diagram]
White to play  

If Black doesn't break symmetry, the game could also be very interesting. Kosh

[Diagram]
White to play  

one possible (symmetry breaking) continuation...


Here is an asymetrical variation:

[Diagram]
A Tengen opening, then a Knights Move  

This allows Black to be flexible anough to make a triple knights shape (two normal knights and one large knight) at either a or b. Note that the resulting shapes by playing at a or b aren't the same (Even if White allows Black to choose between them, the W2 keeps everything from being symetrical).

The technique here is to either force White's stones too far apart and cut... or to make White's stones safely extend and expand at a greater rate because White needs to be cautious.

It may not appeal to everyone -- But for players who appreciate rapid development, or those who enjoy the complicated Taisha, this mini fuseki may be for to you.

- C0nfuseki


The bump page has example of another possible tengen opening.


Charles Matthews Just found this link in a rec.games.go posting by Richard Hunter: [ext] http://pr.fujitsu.com/jp/news/1998/Mar/minigo.html

The game record there is of exactly this opening, although sadly a ko fight going on where the probe was played obscures it a bit. And there was I being sceptical about all this. What is said on the game record image is that this is a game from 1994 between Yamada Kimio 5 dan and Cho Chikun, with komi at 5.5.


[Diagram]
White 3-4 reply  

Phelan: What do you think of this reply? I like it because if Black grabs one corner, White can play 3-4 in another close corner.

[Diagram]
White 3-4 reply  

JohnMoser: I think Black now claims the top left or the bottom, and severely threatens W2. I think W4 on the right side lets Black build a wall, split white stones in the left, try to split W2 and i.e. W5, and might get the top side and maybe attempt to invade the corner. Show me what you think of W4 after B3.

[Diagram]
White 3-4 reply  

Caern: W1 here is weak point in black's wall. To split white black answers B2 and B4. After W5 black lost right corner.


9x9 Tengen Openings last edited by 92.22.195.160 on August 20, 2014 - 16:35
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