3-4 point high approach low extension, trick play

    Keywords: Joseki

After B2, W3 is a normal response. B4 however is not normal, this move is normally played at a. W5 is the only move, after which black plays B6. With B4 and B6, black is trying to trick white.

The normal continuation for white is to play a. White b is a mistake which will result in a bad position (See variations under 'White atari').

[Diagram]
Trick play setup.  

Table of contents Table of diagrams
Trick play setup.
White descends, black descends.
White cuts and is tricked
Tricked, simple continuation
Tricked and a further trick
Further trick, cont'd
Tricked, gote honte ending
Black hane up at 8.
White atari at 7.
White atari, continuation


White descends, black descends

After white extends with W5, black normally plays B6. Alternatively, black can try to brew up trouble by playing c (See variations under 'White descends, black hane up')

[Diagram]
White descends, black descends.  

The correct way to play for white is to give atari at a (see 3-4 point high approach low extension), but many players will be tempted to cut at b. This is a mistake.

[Diagram]
White cuts and is tricked  

After this sequence, may players will feel satisfied that they have captured the marked stone black+circle. In reality, they have been tricked.

[Diagram]
Tricked, simple continuation  

One way for black to continue is to play like this. White gets only 4 or 5 points in the corner, while her marked stones (white+circle) are cut off. Black is strong on both sides, so this result is terrible for white.

[Diagram]
Tricked and a further trick  

Black can also continue with B4. This sets up another trick because the corner is not 100% alive yet. If, for example, white considers the corner alive and plays W5 through W9. Black can kill the corner.

[Diagram]
Further trick, cont'd  

After B1 W2 B3, white cannot play at a due to shortage of liberties

[Diagram]
Tricked, gote honte ending  

Considering the above, white should play 1 to defend the corner. Now the p-q-r threat is gone, because the white capture at s then creates 2 liberties (r, t) instead of damezumari.
The classification of above as "trick" or "obvious threat" is in the eye of the beholder.


White descends, black hane up

[Diagram]
Black hane up at 8.  

After B8, the players are in for a complicated fight. White can avoid that fight by playing a, but playing a comprises a small loss for white.

Herman Hiddema: I will expand on this at a later time. For now, see the discussion at BQM186


White atari

[Diagram]
White atari at 7.  

The white atari at 7 is a mistake. Black captures with B8.

[Diagram]
White atari, continuation  

After black captures the stone at 3-3, white can only give atari with W1. After black defends, white has two cutting points. White will defend the upper cutting point at W3, after which black cuts with B4. With W5 and W7, white sacrifices another stone and sets up a ladder. If the ladder is bad for white, this is a disaster, but even if it is good, black is very happy. Black gets a big corner in sente and can look forward to play a ladder breaker later on.


See also 3-4 point high approach low extension, whole board


3-4 point high approach low extension, trick play last edited by 88.114.153.72 on June 28, 2009 - 17:29
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