2-2 Point Invasion

    Keywords: Tactics
[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion  

The 2-2 point invasion is a trick play made against an isolated 4-4 stone. It is intended to give the invader either an equal result (when the defender takes the side) or a good result (when the defender tries to kill the invasion). However, there is an easy counter to the trick play, and the invader ends up with a horrible result if the defender is not tricked.


[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 1  

This is the response that the invader is hoping for. Here, B4 and B6 seem reasonable, as they seem to confine white to the corner. White then plays two clamps. At first glance, they seem to be a futile attempt to escape, but they're really meant to make black heavy...

[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 1  

White then plays two peeps as kikashi to force black to connect, and then extends towards the side. Now black has a heavy group that only has one eye in the corner.

Anonymous: Question, what if black plays 5-5 would that not allow him to escape to the center?

MrTenuki (KGS 3k): Sure, playing B6 at the 5-5 point is an option. The point is that black HAS to escape to the center now if he wants to keep the group alive, as the heavy group (as said above) only has one eye in the corner and cannot expect to get a second eye from the sides.



[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 1  

Of course, Black can try a counter-attack with B1. Still, Black is going to be at a disadvantage in the upcoming fight. After the W2 kosumi, black cannot threaten to cut at a or b without weakening either of the two groups. And if black attaches at c, white can simply walk ahead of black by extending to d. Black can aim to press down the upper white group, of course, but this result is obviously disastrous for him.

[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 1  

Here's another possibility for black. Now white actually has to worry about the life of the group on the left side. Still, after W2, a and b are miai; white either lives on the side or breaks out. Without support, there's no way for black to get a good result here.


[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 2  

So black could also play this way. In this case, black ends with gote and the result is roughly equal. But this is still not the best play for black, because white's trick play can be punished.




[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 3  

Assuming that there are no other stones nearby, this is one way that black can punish the trick play. Here, the key move here is B6. Unlike Case 1, where B6 is played at a, black has better shape. Also notice that a white clamp at "b" next would be meaningless, because a white peep at "c" next is still not enough to destroy black's eyeshape.


[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 3-A  

This shows what might happen if White is stubborn and tries to repeat the trick play in the same manner as Case 1. Since the W3-B4 exchange removes the possibility for a second peep, White has little choice but to try to settle the outside group. Obviously, this result is horrible for white. (If white tries the make the corner group live without making the W3-B4 exchange, the result would be similar to 3-B as described below. However, that would also turn the W1-B2 exchange into aji keshi.)

Bill: After W5 above, Black can extend at least as far as B6 and still keep the corner dead in good shape.




[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion: Case 3-B  

The best thing that White can do when with best play by black is perhaps to live in the corner. Unfortunately, this can only be achieved in gote, and White is shut in. This is the reason why the 2-2 point invasion is only a trick play at best unless the surrounding situation makes it reasonable.


[Diagram]
The 2-2 point invasion  

Bill: If White played this against me in a handicap game, my first impulse would be to tenuki. White has already made an inefficient play, thank you very much.

[Diagram]
Large scale attack  

Bill: On second thought, though, how about an attack on a relatively large scale? (Maybe the 3-3 is better, but....)

[Diagram]
Looks familiar  

Bill: If White tries W3 to utilize W1, this variation may ensue. It resembles the following joseki position:

[Diagram]
Joseki  

Bill: Except one line over. White not only gets a smaller corner in the previous diagram, Black's influence is greater on the top side.

[Diagram]
Small corner  

Bill: Here is another variation. White is shut in and looks pretty sick.



2-2 Point Invasion last edited by Dieter on September 23, 2011 - 11:09
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