Cho Hun-hyeon's Lectures on Go Techniques

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Cho Hun-hyeon's Lectures on Go Techniques
("曹薰铉对局技巧(全三册)")
http://www.yutopian.com/yut/images/prod/PAY20.jpg https://www.yutopian.com/yut/images/prod/PAY48.jpg https://www.yutopian.com/yut/images/prod/PAY51.jpg
By: Cho Hun-hyeon
Publisher: Yutopian, May 1998, October 2009
ISBN10 1-889554-42-1, 1-889554-44-8, 1-889554-45-7
222, 221, 219 pp.

Table of contents Table of diagrams
Diagram 1 - Ladders and Connecting Stones
Diagram 2 - Not Too Good
Diagram 3 - Correct Sequence
Diagram 4 - The Difference
Diagram 5 - Black Gains Nothing
Diagram 5 - The Sequence that Follows
Problem 11 - White to Play
Diagram 1 - Might as Well be Dead
Diagram 2 - No Base
Diagram 3 - Clumsy
Diagram 4 - Under Attack
Diagram 5 - The Correct Sequence
Diagram 6 - A Variation

Lectures on Go Techniques by Cho Hun-hyeon is a three volume set (as of June 2014). The first volume focuses on the early opening while the second volume emphasizes the late opening and very early middle game.

The true value of these books lies in the numerous solution diagrams. For each problem, half a dozen seemingly reasonable but incorrect alternatives are explored and the reason why each is wrong explained in the text accompanying the diagram. Once the wrong responses have been dealt with the correct response is shown and explained. Afterward, there is an additional diagram showing the continuation from the correct answer. As such the book is much closer being several professional lessons on the early opening than it is to being a problem book. A player who can identify the possible answers, select the correct one, and know why the others are wrong, would be a mid to high level AGA dan player (3-5 dan AGA).

Volume 1 is a translation of the first volume of 曹薰铉对局技巧(全三册)(Cho Hun-Hyeon's Even Game Techniques (Vol 1-3) ISBN 7-80092-539-0). Volume 2 is a translation of the second volume consisting of 54 problems. Hopefully, volume 3 will contain 51 problems and be forthcoming from Yutopian in the future (as of October 2010) The other two volumes consist of 54 and 51 problems.

Vol 3 is published [ext] https://www.yutopian.com/yutop/cat?product=PAY51&category=PAY


Volume 1

Volume 1 edited by Craig R. Hutchinson, and published by Yutopian (ISBN: 1-889554-42-1) consists of two sections: an exposition on shape followed by 45 early opening problems that focus on positions which arise frequently in games. If one knows a few basic techniques (say 5 kyu AGA), the problems are fairly easy.

Reviews

David Carlton's [ext] review of Volume 1

Table of Contents

to be added

. Once again, the question is, how will rescuing or sacrificing the two stones benefit the situation? The key is, how to flexibly atari?

[Diagram]
Diagram 1 - Ladders and Connecting Stones  

Black ataris at B1 to extend his liberties, before cutting at B3. After the sequence to White 6, the ladder at a does not favor Black. Black fails.

[Diagram]
Diagram 2 - Not Too Good  

Black ataris at B1 separating White and completely controls the corner after the sequence through B5. However, Black does not like how the two black stones are captured. Black can do better though...

[Diagram]
Diagram 3 - Correct Sequence  

Black should first atari at B1, forcing White to connect at W2, before the atari at B3. White the sequence through B7, Black cuts White apart and ends with a better shape.

[Diagram]
Diagram 4 - The Difference  

This shows the final position in Diagram 2. Black ataris at black+circle without exchanging Black a for White b. As a result, White has no need to connect at b. Thus, play order is very important in Go.

[Diagram]
Diagram 5 - Black Gains Nothing  

When White captures at white+circle, Black greedily jump to B1 instead of protecting the corner. Using Black's weakness, White secures the corner and Black gets nothing.

[Diagram]
Diagram 5 - The Sequence that Follows  

Continuing from the previous diagram, Black hanes at B1. However, White's atari at W2 make life in the corner with the sequence through W8. Although Black captures one stone, he is not satisfied.


Volume 2

Volume 2 edited by Paul Henerlau, translated by Catherine Chen and published by Yutopian (ISBN: 1-889554-44-) consists of one section of 54 late opening and early middle game problems.

Reviews

to be added

Table on Contents

  • Problem 1
  • Problem 2
  • ...
  • Problem 53
  • Problem 54
  • Japanese Terms for Go Concepts
  • Index

Sample Material

[Diagram]
Problem 11 - White to Play  

Black captures the White white+circle stone with B1. White now must decide between living on the inside and running to the outside. White can use the forcing moves of a and b to help settle this group.

[Diagram]
Diagram 1 - Might as Well be Dead  

It's bad to be forced to live like this so early in the game. White lives with the moves to W5. However, Black captures one stone in sente, then aims to attack the White stones on the right side. This is terrible.

[Diagram]
Diagram 2 - No Base  

White jumps out to the center with W1, but B2 takes away White's base and eye space at the same time. White is floating in midair.

[Diagram]
Diagram 3 - Clumsy  

Beginners would be tempted to push out with W1 and think they are doing well by running out. Black becomes very thick. This is also terrible for White.

[Diagram]
Diagram 4 - Under Attack  

In response to W1, B2 is very calm. White's bamboo joint at 3 protects against the cut. Black continues the relentless attack with B4.

[Diagram]
Diagram 5 - The Correct Sequence  

Black 4 at white+circle.

White forces with W1 and W3, then jumps out to 5. Black cannot cut at a because of White 1. White is being efficient.

[Diagram]
Diagram 6 - A Variation  

If Black connects at B2, then White ataris with W3 in sente. White succeeds in getting out into the open, and gets much needed eye space as well.


Cho Hun-hyeon's Lectures on Go Techniques last edited by 128.59.238.195 on October 17, 2014 - 20:59
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