4-4 point low approach low extension, slide, 3-3

  Difficulty: Intermediate   Keywords: Joseki
[Diagram]
Standard joseki  

After the slide W1, black commonly plays at 3-3. W3 is the most common continuation, and is the standard joseki mentioned in 4-4 point low approach low extension. If White omits W3, black can attack the white group. For variations on that, see: 4-4 point low approach low extension, slide, 3-3, tenuki.

Instead of W3, white also sometimes plays a, usually when white has a low solid position in the upper right, in which case W3 would be too low. This variation is discussed further down in the section title high extension


Table of contents

The standard joseki

This page aims to give a deeper discussion to this joseki.

Miai plays

[Diagram]
Miai plays  

Assuming there is some white stone or structure, say at white+circle. We will say that W1 and B2 are miai. In fact, B2 is very big and gives the black corner a base.

(The main alternative to B2 is Black a in the centre. The use of this play is discussed at 4-4 point low approach low extension, standard joseki, pushing in the centre. See also [1] below.)


Losing the base in the corner

[Diagram]
Tenuki  

For black to tenuki when white+circle is played is not a good idea. W1 gains substantially in territory and sets up an attack. B2 or a is the correct play, but black has not gained much territory or influence in this move. For B2 to play at b is a dangerous choice.

Uberdude In fact this B2 is a poor move, as is a. c is the most common answer, leaning on a strong group to come out. If you want to jump d is a good shape for this, it runs fast, aims at pressing on the group on the side and attacking at c. (50 hits on this shape (exlcuding the 2 space extension on the left, adding it makes little difference) in my GoGoD: 34 @ c, 5 @ d, 1 @ B2, 0 @ a.

RBerenguel I can't give a personal analysis on B2, but this is the move Sakata suggests in Suji and Anti-Suji of Go, Model 6: The one-point jump suji

[Diagram]
All territory gone  

If the ladder towards the lower right is good, then W1, W3, and W5 will steal all of Black's territory, rendering eyeless. Note the important assumption of the working ladder, which we illustrate in the subsequent diagrams. However, white can always choose to play a ladder breaker somewhere in the lower right, so the danger still lurks.

[Diagram]
The ladder  

This diagram shows the start of the sequence that leads to a ladder. Note that B2 and B4 is a tesuji: if W5 is played at a, then black b captures the two white stones by double shortage of liberties.

[Diagram]
The ladder  

The ladder refers to W3. If this ladder works for White, then Black collapses totally.

[Diagram]
Resistance  

Therefore, if the ladder is not good for Black, Black may try to resist by making the hane at B2. This may be seen as a trick play which breaks the ladder. The correct response is to connect at W3. Black can only descend at B4, and after W5 Black has gained nothing.


Below we discuss some finer details of this variation.

[Diagram]
Failure  

This is a failure diagram to show why the direct capture of black+circle with W3 does not work.

[Diagram]
Failure  

Playing W5 without pressing at B6 first is a mistake for White. After B6, if White a, then Black b, then is reverts to the previous diagram, where White is captured.

[Diagram]
Not good enough  

Connecting with W5 here allows Black to capture two White stones, and this result favours Black. Note that the turn at B6 is important: if B6 is played directly at B8, then W7 at a seals the Black group in.


[1] Addendum

[Diagram]
The attachment  

Here we discuss the exchange of B2 and W3, followed by tenuki.

[Diagram]
Black secures the base  

Later, it is possible to answer W1 with B2, securing the base. However, the exchange of black+circle and white+circle strengthens white, losing the possibility of any invasion in white's two space expansion on the top. Also, white gains significantly in the exchange of W1 and B2 (because if black plays at B1, black can aim at a to capture a white stone). So the price to pay for the tenuki is considerable.

[Diagram]
Invasion not possible  

The good thing is, the invasion at W1 is no longer possible. Black applies the B2, B4 tesuji mentioned above but this time it works without the precondition of a working ladder. The reason is, with black+circle, black can play at B8, and white is finished.


High extension

[Diagram]
High extension  

White can also play W3 like this, which is usually done when white has a low solid position in the upper right.

[Diagram]
Example position  

For example: If the position in the upper right is like this (the result of a common joseki), W3 is better high, because of the low solid position of the white+circle stone. If W3 were a two space extension, white would have four stones on the third line in a row, and would have a very low position.

W3 invites Black to invade at a, after which white can use the power of white+circle effectively in an attack on the invading stone. If black does not invade, white may build her position with a move at b or c

[Diagram]
Follow-up  

If black invades, we can expect something like this sequence.



Black's follow-up

[Diagram]
Black's follow-up  

If Black has a stone at black+circle, he can pressure the White formation. There is extensive coverage of this position in the book After Joseki

[Diagram]
Variation 1  

Here, Black takes territory

[Diagram]
Variation 2  
[Diagram]
Variation 2 (cont.)  

Black acquires good influence


4-4 point low approach low extension, slide, 3-3 last edited by RBerenguel on April 16, 2012 - 14:55
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