4463 enclosure 3-4 contact

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Table of contents Table of diagrams
3-4 contact play
Black's replies
Pro play 1 - keeping the corner (''a'' or ''b'' next)
Pro play 2 - giving the corner
Counter hane on the second line - I
Variation ''a'' - White splits the shimari and takes outside influence
Variation ''b'' - White lives small
Counter hane on the second line - II
Counter hane on the second line - II - follow up
Counter hane on the second line III
Crosscut
Inside hane I
Continuation - Outside hane
Eye stealing tesuji with lots of aji
Eye stealing tesuji with lots of aji
Eye stealing tesuji with lots of aji
3-4 contact play

[Diagram]
3-4 contact play  

This contact play W1 is a normal measure taken against the 4463 enclosure. Since the 3-3 invasion typically becomes ko, W1 is a simpler approach to take, though it means that Black can take a solid corner if he so chooses.

[Diagram]
Black's replies  

In pro games, Black next at a to confine White to the corner is somewhat more popular than Black at b, to defend the corner territory and allow White room on the left side.

Outside hane

Counter hane (3-4)

[Diagram]
Pro play 1 - keeping the corner (a or b next)  
[Diagram]
Pro play 2 - giving the corner  


Counter hane on the second line

[Diagram]
Counter hane on the second line - I  
[Diagram]
Variation a - White splits the shimari and takes outside influence  

I find this variation once by Ma Xiaochun (winning) against Yoo Chang Hyuk in the Samsung Cup 2001, and by Nakamura Hidehito (losing) against Kono Rin in the 2007 Meijin Preliminary. In both cases there are other stones in the proximity - reducing the influence of the possible black wall reached by variation b.

[Diagram]
Variation b - White lives small  
[Diagram]
Counter hane on the second line - II  

tapir: Whites eyespace is somewhat dubious here...

[Diagram]
Counter hane on the second line - II - follow up  

tapir: Example from pro play, white has only 1,5 eyes locally.

[Diagram]
Counter hane on the second line III  

tapir: this last one is simplified, that is decontextualized... please add scholarship here.

tapir: please take notice of the fact, that in all lines given until now, it is black to chose between taking outside influence or keeping the corner and the option to keep the corner is available even after the outside hane.

Crosscut

tapir: After the crosscut I can only find one stable (played more than once) line in my small database. Please help!

[Diagram]
Crosscut  

Dieter: Such a crosscut is never played in isolation but as an emergency tactic with other, more important stones involved. Two pro games had this much space around the crosscut, once as a ko threat and once as a ladder breaker so the context was even bigger!

Inside hane

[Diagram]
Inside hane I  

Here is one possible continuation for the inside hane. Sometimes, White may exchange a for b before extending to 4, or White may play directly at c instead of 4 to get a lighter shape. It all depends on the surrounding stones.


Variations (Old page)

There are many variations here, Here are some of the more common ones. Usually, White plays the contact play to invade after Black has extended along the side. Otherwise, another approach is usually more appropriate.

[Diagram]
Continuation - Outside hane  

Here is one possible continuation for the outside hane. If Black plays at a, White will usually respond at b to secure the corner.

jwaytogo

tderz Black will rather start with b to threaten to initiate a ko (esp. if circle is occupied by a black+circle).

jwaytogo Ahh, I knew I was missing something, probably more correct to say that if Black plays at circle, then white will usually defend at b. Thanks for the assistance, tderz!

E.g. Mingren,12,China,Zhongxing Telecom,

  Round     2, league
  Black     Chang Hao, 9 dan
  White     Wang Yuhui, 6 dan   (sorry that's with an ogeima)

Event 6th Gosei title

  Round     Preliminary round
  Black     Hisai Keishi, 9 dan
  White     Asano Hideaki, 5 dan

That would be the perfect example game sequence:

 Event     Fujitsu Cup,16,Japan,Fujitsu
  Round     3, Quarter final, 2
  Black     Lee ChangHo, 9p (plays at "b")
  White     O Rissei, 9p
  Komi     6.5
  Date     2003-06-07
  Place     Japan
  Result     B+4.5

The ko does not appear, rather an intersting other option Event Oteai

  Black     Inoue Kunio, 6 dan  (plays at "b")
  White     Kosugi Masaru, 6 dan
  Komi     0
  Date     1982-06-30
  Place     Nihon Kiin, Tokyo, Japan
  Result     B+8

Event 13th Meijin title

  Round    league, 21
  Black    Iwamoto Kaoru, 9 dan   (plays at "b")
  White    Honda Kunihisa, 9 dan
  Komi     5
  Date     1974-05-22,23
  Place     Japan
  Result     W+12
 Black     Lee Changho, 3 dan
  White    Kim Hee-chong, 7 dan   (plays at "b")
  Komi     5.5
  Date     1989-03-07
  Place    Korea
  Result   B+R
[Diagram]
Eye stealing tesuji with lots of aji  
[Diagram]
Eye stealing tesuji with lots of aji  
[Diagram]
Eye stealing tesuji with lots of aji  

tderz: the ko ...

jwaytogo


[Diagram]
3-4 contact play  

Is it not better for Black to confine White to the corner for influence, especially if he has side extensions to his orginal 4-4 6-3 corner enclosure?

tapir: What is this? Looks so strange and small. The professionals play (in my database invariably two lines, after W1,B2,W3), s. Counter hane.

Yes I saw this in either enclosure joskies or ishida's joseki dictionary and I think it's outdated.


4463 enclosure 3-4 contact last edited by 116.88.135.217 on October 13, 2016 - 22:09
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